Misha Lamp

Taeg Nishimoto is a Japanese and American architect, designer and educator. His work continuously explores the relationships between different materials, objects and spaces. The Misha Lamps are part of a series of investigations into the behavior of fabric in lighting. The white fabric is made from recycled plastic bottles and it is meticulously formed to provide a shape with a rich play of shadow and light.

In order to create the shape of the fabric, it is first cut into a square and then immersed into a fabric hardening material. It is then transferred to a framed structure which holds each one of its corners. The fabric is then pulled upwards at specific points using threads which have round weights. The weights create the distinct creases in the material and give it its unique shape. The fabric is then left to dry until it is completely hardens.

The material is then placed upside down onto the lamp which consists of a minimalist black plastic tube with a light bulb inside. The fabric is then reinforced by two sets of metallic wires which connect to the lamp base.

You can enjoy the lamps both when they are lit and when they are turned on. When the light is off, the drape effect in itself is captivating, and when lit, the play of light and shadow through the uneven and folded fabric is mesmerizing.

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Design: Taeg Nishimoto
Photography courtesy of Taeg Nishimoto

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